So what exactly is a Snood?

snood

The chenille snood comes in many different colors, is comfortable and has a soft touch.

So what exactly is a Snood?

The tword “Snood” causes quite a bit of confusion, and rightly so. For years, different people have used the word to mean different things. So let’s try  clearing up  the confusion, and perhaps give a drop of background information on what a hair snood really is.

The term “snood’ is used to  refer to 3 separate thing.

1) Snood scarfs are used to describe tubular scarfs, thesescarfs were especially popular with English Soccer (football) players until they were banned in 2001 by the governing body of the sport for being a danger to the players.

2) The term “snood” also refers to a 1 inch silk ribbon that was worn in Scotland in the late 19th century worn by unmarried girls, typically it was braided into the girl’s hair.

3) The hair snood is the form of snood that we are most interested in. You probably guessed already that this is actually a as you guessed is actually ahair covering that one wear on ones hair.

Now, most snoods you see now-a-days are crocheted. However, it did not start out like that . At first snood head coverings were made from cloth or net fabric

Many of them were elaborately decorated with bows and ribbons. Gradually, these went out of style until WW2 when once agin women turned to them as headcoverings since the material used to make them was not rationed as the material used to make hats was.

In fact, snoods became a patriotic symbol!

Snoods have remained as a popular headcovering for women looking to cover their hair for modesty reasons as well as for women looking for a hairnet to wear when working with food, in a canteen or a hospital.

A major difference between women wearing hair snoods for religious purposes and women wearing them as  hair nets is whether or not they have a lining. Women who choose them for use as a religious headcover will often ensure they are lined in order to be certain no hair will show through. Such is not the case in women wearing snoods as hairnets. Lately, the Chenille snood has come into style as a it is extremely soft to the touch and available in a wide variety of colors.

( Sources include Scottish Weading Dreams, Wikipedia, and Wise Geek)

By: B. Levi

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