Tag Archive | hat act

The Hat Museum

SG: Beach Hat with Flower

The largest selection of hats in the world at The Hat Museum

Well you love wearing a Hat and your wardrobe contains all sorts of hats. Wide brimmed straw hats for sunny days, a warm cloche to keep warm in the winter, and even a Fedora for a touch of style. But you wonder where you could find out some more information about hats.

 Where can you find out a whole lot more about hats? Their History? The different types of womens Hats? In short all about them.

Well it so happens that in the USA there is a great place tofind out all about hats and it’s appropriately called

 Hat museum. Where is it? Well in Portland, Oregon there’s a neighborhood called

Ladd’s Addition. This neighborhood was developed by a buisnessman by the name of William S. Ladd. The actual construction was roughly between the years of 1905 and 1930. Ladds’s Addition has a bunch of interesting things. Amongst them are four parks situated at the four points of the compass and the the largest stand of elms in Portland. Most interesting is the fact that this neighborhood boasts of 122 houses that are considered of Primary Historical Significance. Yup 122 of them. One of these is the Ladd-Reingold House which is the current of the Hat Museam. The name Reingold is after Miss. Rebecca Reingold who was a milliner in Russia and moved into the house in the early 1900’s. The house’s current owner is Alyce Cornyn-Selby who beleive it or not is actually a Hat Lover herself! The Museam claims to have over 1000 different hats in stock including a Straw London Top Hat, a Thanksgiving table hat that sings and more hats from around the world. The Museam bills itself as one of Portlands “quirkiest attractions”. So if you’re in Portland stop by, check it out and tell us if it’s really true that they have more types of womens hats then we sell on Myheadcoverings.com.(sources include reelscout, the Hat Museam website, Rose City Roamers)

 By B.Levi

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Womens Hats – A History

Womens Hats - A History

Hats are generally acknowledged to have been around for a long time. A very long time. In fact the Greek at called the “petasos” which looked something like a modern day sombrero is considered the mother of All brimmed hats. In ancient times hats denoted status. In fact in ancient Rome slaves were not allowed to wear hats at all, but if they were freed they were granted a hat in celebration. For centuries hats were considered a mostly male garb. While in many places women did cover their hair in public as a matter of refinement, they did so with various headscarvesand shawls as well as hoods, while men wore hats.

This began to change in the late 1500’s when women’s’ hats began to be made. Through the 1600’s hats began to be designed exclusively for women. Gradually, makers of male hats and ladies hats were separated and the term hat maker came to be used exclusively for makers of male hats while the term milliner came to be used for makers of female hats. The term Milliner comes from the traveling salesmen from Milan, Italy who used to circulate selling hats.

As women’s hats grew in popularity, they began to be decorated elaborately with feathers. Lots of feathers. Sometimes whole birds worth of feathers – and in America the Audubon society registered a formal complaint against it! Slowly womens hat wearing reached its peak around WW1 and then began to decline rapidly after WW2. However when Princess Diana came around she revived the concept of the Dress Hat, wearing hats during formal occasions to add a touch of style to her outfits.

While it is no longer considered scandalous for a woman to walk outside without her hat, still women’s hats continue to be popular. Why? The uses for a hat are so varied that it’s one item that just can’t go away! Religious women who cover their hair for modesty purposes wear hats; women suffering from hair loss wear hats; Women wear hats on windy days to protest their hair style; Women wear sun hats to protect them from the sun; Women wear winter hats in the winter for warmth.

And in true Princess Di style hats for ladies are something of a fashion statement at formal occasion.

by: B. Levi

(Sources include: Fashion Era, E How, Wise Geek, Hat History)

The Hat Act of 1732

 

The Hat Act of 1732

The Hat Act of 1732 and the effect on Womens Headcoverings

What was the Hat Act?

Everyone knows about the Boston Tea Party, and the crucial role the colonists’ protest against the taxes England wanted to place on tea imports played in sparking The American Revolution.

However did you know that headcovers also played a major role?

Before the American Revolution the English Government enacted a policy
called Mercantilism in respect to the American colonies. The purpose of this policy was to ensure that all raw products from the American Colonies would be shipped to England to be turned into finished products and then shipped back to the American Colonies.

At that time in history  everyone wore hats women, men, children – just about everyone – and a major source of the material used to produce these hats was beaver pelts from the American Colonies. In fact in 1631 over 12,000 pounds of beaver pelts were shipped from the American Colonies back to England!

So you can understand that as soon as a  “homemade” hat industry began to flourish in the American Colonies the folks back in England got worried and decided to do all they could to protect their “hat making industry”.

The Result?

The infamous 1732 Hat Act which placed a number of restrictions on American Hatmakers. These included  limiting the number of workers they could employ, the number of apprentices they could have. The intention of all this was to drive up the cost of making a hat in the colonies thereby ensuring the continued dominance of the English made hat.

The Hat Act of 1732 became known historically as one of the laws that restricted commerce in the Colonies leading to the growing divide between the Colonies and England which eventually led to the American Revolution.

Now don’t forget to buy modern-day hats for women at www.myheadcoverings.com

( Sources include Wikipedia, encyclopedia Britannica, Colonial America.info, American Revolution.org)

By: B. Levi