Tag Archive | wool hats

Hats Around the World: Part 2

The next stop on our world hat tour will be…..Asia.

And here we can find some really cool and interesting hats.

Korea: Ever heard of the Ayam?

Traditional Korean Hat

Ayam Hat

It’s a really cool looking hat that was worn basically by Korean Women from 1392 till 1910 as a winter hat. It was made from silk and fur during the Joselan period. The Ayam was worn mostly by female commoners.

The Ayam isn’t the only interesting hat you might see in Korea another one is the Gat, yes that’s the name, Gat. The Gat  was also worn during the Josean Dynasty. It was usually Cylindrically shaped with a really wide brim and during the 19th century was restricted to married and middle class men; sort of a social class thing. Now hows about a visit to…

China: One hat with a really exotic name is the Phoenix Crown Hat or Coronet. This was a really spectacular looking hat that was worn by noblewomen mostly in the Ming Dynasty (the ruling dynasty of China from 1368 to 1644) this hat, which was more of a headdress could have over 5000 pearls and 100 gemstones sewn into it!

Korean Gat Hat

Korean Gat Hat

And headcovering fun in ancient China was not exclusive to the female gender the men  also had some cool hats, here’s one:

The heads  of the Chinese Han  officials during during the aforementioned Ming Dynasty, usually  covered up  with a black hat that had two  flaps (sort of like wings) made of thin, oval shaped boards on each side. The hat was  called the Wushamao  and the common folks were not supposed to be wearing one of these   headdresses unless they were the lucky guests attending a wedding ceremonies or event, (Party anyone?) involving noble families or officials.

And now a stop in Burma (Myanmar).

The Gaung Paung ( for those that don’t know it means headwrap) is a hat that is not so different looking then a turban and is traditionally worn by the Shan, Rakhine and Mon peoples.

Depending on the wealth of the owner it is either made from silk or cotton. Its  mostly a ceremonial piece of headwear and if you look closely you will know the ethnic group of the wearer as each ethnic group wears it slightly differently.

Cambodia/Vietnam: We’ll round up our tour of Asia with the most famous Asian Hat of all the Conical shaped hat which is really worn by farmers throughout Asia. Some know it as a “coolie” hat, though as Wikipedia notes now-a-days many find that term offensive.

coolie

Aisan Hat

It’s called a conical hap ’cause thats it’s shape, a cone, and it has a strap that goes under the wearers chin keeping it in place. The point of the hat is mostly for sun protection.

Well that wraps up the Asian portion of our tour.

Follow the MyHeadcoverings BLOG to make certain you don’t miss Part 3 of our World Hat tour!

The Hat Museum

SG: Beach Hat with Flower

The largest selection of hats in the world at The Hat Museum

Well you love wearing a Hat and your wardrobe contains all sorts of hats. Wide brimmed straw hats for sunny days, a warm cloche to keep warm in the winter, and even a Fedora for a touch of style. But you wonder where you could find out some more information about hats.

 Where can you find out a whole lot more about hats? Their History? The different types of womens Hats? In short all about them.

Well it so happens that in the USA there is a great place tofind out all about hats and it’s appropriately called

 Hat museum. Where is it? Well in Portland, Oregon there’s a neighborhood called

Ladd’s Addition. This neighborhood was developed by a buisnessman by the name of William S. Ladd. The actual construction was roughly between the years of 1905 and 1930. Ladds’s Addition has a bunch of interesting things. Amongst them are four parks situated at the four points of the compass and the the largest stand of elms in Portland. Most interesting is the fact that this neighborhood boasts of 122 houses that are considered of Primary Historical Significance. Yup 122 of them. One of these is the Ladd-Reingold House which is the current of the Hat Museam. The name Reingold is after Miss. Rebecca Reingold who was a milliner in Russia and moved into the house in the early 1900’s. The house’s current owner is Alyce Cornyn-Selby who beleive it or not is actually a Hat Lover herself! The Museam claims to have over 1000 different hats in stock including a Straw London Top Hat, a Thanksgiving table hat that sings and more hats from around the world. The Museam bills itself as one of Portlands “quirkiest attractions”. So if you’re in Portland stop by, check it out and tell us if it’s really true that they have more types of womens hats then we sell on Myheadcoverings.com.(sources include reelscout, the Hat Museam website, Rose City Roamers)

 By B.Levi

Womens Hats – A History

Womens Hats - A History

Hats are generally acknowledged to have been around for a long time. A very long time. In fact the Greek at called the “petasos” which looked something like a modern day sombrero is considered the mother of All brimmed hats. In ancient times hats denoted status. In fact in ancient Rome slaves were not allowed to wear hats at all, but if they were freed they were granted a hat in celebration. For centuries hats were considered a mostly male garb. While in many places women did cover their hair in public as a matter of refinement, they did so with various headscarvesand shawls as well as hoods, while men wore hats.

This began to change in the late 1500’s when women’s’ hats began to be made. Through the 1600’s hats began to be designed exclusively for women. Gradually, makers of male hats and ladies hats were separated and the term hat maker came to be used exclusively for makers of male hats while the term milliner came to be used for makers of female hats. The term Milliner comes from the traveling salesmen from Milan, Italy who used to circulate selling hats.

As women’s hats grew in popularity, they began to be decorated elaborately with feathers. Lots of feathers. Sometimes whole birds worth of feathers – and in America the Audubon society registered a formal complaint against it! Slowly womens hat wearing reached its peak around WW1 and then began to decline rapidly after WW2. However when Princess Diana came around she revived the concept of the Dress Hat, wearing hats during formal occasions to add a touch of style to her outfits.

While it is no longer considered scandalous for a woman to walk outside without her hat, still women’s hats continue to be popular. Why? The uses for a hat are so varied that it’s one item that just can’t go away! Religious women who cover their hair for modesty purposes wear hats; women suffering from hair loss wear hats; Women wear hats on windy days to protest their hair style; Women wear sun hats to protect them from the sun; Women wear winter hats in the winter for warmth.

And in true Princess Di style hats for ladies are something of a fashion statement at formal occasion.

by: B. Levi

(Sources include: Fashion Era, E How, Wise Geek, Hat History)

The French Legend of the Beret

Red Beret

Where did the Beret originate?

They’ve been around so long that it’s not really clear where the beret was first invented. In fact French legend gives credit to Noah for its creation. According to the legend Noah used wool to insulate the the ark. With all the animals trampling on it for 40 days and 40 nights it turned into a tough material or fabric. That fabric, according to the legend was felt. Noah then used the felt to make himself a cap – or the first felt beret!

There’s another opinion that it was shepherds who first created the beret hat. Why shepherds? Well they wore these knitted wool hats outside every day and due to the weather conditions it swelled and became solid felt. And thus, they had a beret.
Most probably though, the beret hat originated in Greece 2,500 years ago. The Romans thought very highly of it so they adopted them. Soon it became the style for man, woman and child. Berets were seen everywhere in Rome. So, therefore they became known as a Greek – Roman hat.
From 2,500 years ago the hat beret has definitely come a long way, here are some of the more popular uses they’ve  been put to since the 1900’s.
– In the early 1900’s berets were mostly worn by the French (in France). Of course, Belgians also wore them since France set the trend for them. In France and Belgium, berets were worn only by men, either for uniform or style. It was also worn by younger boys for style.
– In the 1920’s the womens beret became very popular in America for women and girls. It was designed and decorated in a more feminine manner and was a very fashionable head covering.
– In the 1930’s the beret was mostly worn by men and boys in France and Belgium. In America, it was now little boys who wore berets for style.
– In the 1940’s, the beret hat was adopted by many military groups and forces.
– In the1950’s, scouts outside of France decided to adopt the beret as a uniform hat. They made a great uniform hat for a scout since they were comfortable and sat on the head in any position. They also got the idea from the military. Since the military had adopted this hat for their uniform it was more prestigious. However, once the military and the scouts started wearing these in France, men and little boys were rarely seen wearing berets for style anymore.
So there you have it. The concise history of the beret hat. Now-a-days they continue to be a fashionable head covering and the latest trends alway’s feature some version of this versatile little womens hat!